Flu Facts and Vaccination Clinic

Who Needs a Flu Vaccine? You.

 

Get Your Flu Shot!

Vaccination is the best way to protect yourself and others from influenza (the flu). The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends everyone 6 months of age and older get vaccinated each year against the flu. For current recommendations regarding who should and shouldn't get vaccinated click on Who Needs a Flu Vaccine and When.

Flu Vaccination at the Student Health Center

Appointments and Fees

Flu shots are available by appointment for eligible students, faculty and staff. To schedule an appointment, please call 323.343.3300.

  • Currently enrolled students: No cost
    • Note: This service is based on eligibility to use Student Health Center services. Please click on Eligibility for information. Proof of eligibility is required prior to receiving services. Please bring your current student ID card with you to your appointment.
  • Current employees: $20
    • Note: Payment by cash or checks is required for this service. Please bring exact change when paying in cash. Proof of current employment is required prior to receiving services. Please bring your current employee ID with you to your appointment.

Masks are Required

All visitors to the Student Health Center are required to wear a face mask before entry to and while in the Center. Please visit Los Angeles Department of Public Health's COVID-19: Masks page for mask guidance.

  • Please note: Face masks with valves or vents should not be used.

COVID-19 Screening

In order to receive a flu shot at the Student Health Center, students and employees must:

  • Not have respiratory or other symptoms associated with COVID-19 on their appointment date or have had symptoms within 10 days of the scheduled appointment.
  • Not have been in close contact with anyone who has or likely has COVID-19 within 10 days of the scheduled appointment.
  • Be screened by a Student Health Center (SHC) nurse, including a temperature check, prior to entering the SHC. Students and employees should call 323.343.3302 upon arrival at the SHC.

Flu Facts

What is Seasonal Flu?

Seasonal flu is a contagious respiratory illness caused by influenza viruses. Approximately 5-20% of U.S. residents get the flu each year. In the United States, flu season occurs in the fall and winter. Seasonal flu activity usually peaks in January or February, but it can occur as early as October and end as late as May.

How Does Seasonal Flu Spread?

Flu spreads when a person with the flu coughs, sneezes, or talks and droplets containing their germs land in your mouth or nose. You can also get the flu by touching a surface or object that has flu virus on it and then touching your mouth, eyes, or nose.

Who is at Highest Risk of Developing Serious Health Complications?

Seniors (those age 65 and older), children (especially those younger than 5), people with chronic health conditions, and pregnant individuals are among those who are more likely to experience flu-related complications — serious, potentially life-threatening conditions. Each year more than 140,000 people are hospitalized for flu-related complications in the United States. Together, flu and pneumonia (a flu complication) are typically in the ten leading causes of death in the U.S.

What are Common Complications from the Seasonal Flu?

Complications include:

  • Bacterial pneumonia
  • Ear or sinus infections
  • Dehydration
  • Heart, brain and muscle inflammation
  • Worsening of chronic health conditions
  • Severe illness and death

How Can I Protect Myself from Seasonal Flu?

Vaccination is the best way to protect yourself from the flu, but there are additional steps you can take to help protect yourself and others:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer (at least 60% alcohol).
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Practice good health habits. Get plenty of sleep and exercise, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat healthy food.
  • Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue in the trash after you use it.

For additional information on how to avoid seasonal flu, click on Preventive Steps or consult your healthcare provider.

Differences and Similarities Between the Flu and COVID-19

What's the Difference Between the Flu and COVID-19?

In some ways the flu and COVID-19 are alike (e.g., both are contagious viral infections that cause similar symptoms), and in others, different (e.g., COVID-19 is associated with the loss of taste and smell and more severe illness). However, because there is overlap in symptoms between COVID-19, the flu and other respiratory infections, testing is required to determine which illness a person has.

Can Someone Have the Flu and COVID-19 at the Same Time?

Yes, it's possible to be infected with the viruses that cause COVID-19 and the flu (and other infections) at the same time. Testing can help determine what infection(s) someone has.

Signs and Symptoms of Flu and COVID-19

Both COVID-19 and flu can have varying degrees of signs and symptoms, ranging from no symptoms (asymptomatic) to severe symptoms. Common symptoms that COVID-19 and flu share include:

  • Fever or feeling feverish/having chills
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath or difficulty breathing
  • Fatigue (tiredness)
  • Sore throat
  • Runny or stuffy nose
  • Muscle pain or body aches
  • Headache
  • Vomiting and diarrhea
  • Change in or loss of taste or smell, although this is more frequent with COVID-19

What to Do if You Develop Flu or COVID-19 Symptoms

Students

Call the Student Health Center (323.343.3300) or your primary care physician, get tested for COVID-19, and follow isolation instructions. If the Student Health Center and/or your primary care physician is not available and you need immediate medical advice, please go to the nearest urgent care or emergency room or call 911.

Employees

Contact your primary care physician, get tested for COVID-19, and follow isolation instructions. If your primary care physician is not available and you need immediate medical advice, please go to the nearest urgent care or emergency room or call 911. Notify the appropriate campus administrator.

Related Resources

Source: CDC's Influenza