Immigration Issues and Resources

 

#protectdreamers

President's Message


 

2/28/18

Dear University Community:

Yesterday the Supreme Court declined to hear a request by the Trump administration regarding Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals. This decision means key aspects of DACA remain intact. For now, DACA students and employees may continue to study and work.

The Supreme Court’s action is not a permanent solution or a final decision. This is a very fluid matter. The Trump administration’s challenge to DACA will now move through the normal appellate process. I urge Dreamers who are eligible to submit DACA renewal applications immediately. The University will continue to provide assistance to those who are submitting renewal applications. We have made non-state funds available to cover the fee associated with the application. Applications are available in the Office of the Vice President for Student Life, in Student Affairs, Room 108. The Office of Communications and Public Affairs will assist students who need photographs. Photos will be taken at no cost, but appointments must be scheduled. Students should call the Office of Communications and Public Affairs at (323) 343-3050 to make an appointment with our photographer. The CSU has provided a list of free legal support services for Dreamers. Please utilize these resources and share the information with others. Our Immigration Issues and Resources website provides useful information and updates.

I have joined with many others across the nation in calling for Congress and the courts to find a permanent solution that will allow Dreamers to continue to contribute to the vitality of our community. I am hopeful that lawmakers will heed the voices of Dreamers, and those of us advocating on their behalf. Students, as you go to class and work, remain focused on the future you are creating for yourself, your family and your community. Cal State LA supports you.

Sincerely,

William A. Covino


 

 

 

 Upcoming Events

July

27

Immigration Legal Clinic

Dreamers Resource Center  SA214 |  1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Click to Register

Tues.

Dreamers Counseling

Dreamers Resource Center  SA214 |  2 to 3 p.m.

Weds.

DACA Workshops

Dreamers Resource Center  SA214 |  10 a.m to 12 p.m.

 


 

In The News

The Washington Post’s David Nakamura explains why the debate on DACA, an Obama-era program shielding young undocumented immigrants from deportation, isn’t over. Bastien Inzaurralde/The Washington Post

Federal judge: Trump administration must accept new DACA applications

A D.C. federal judge has delivered the toughest blow yet to Trump administration efforts to end deportation protections for young undocumented immigrants, ordering the government to continue the Obama-era program and — for the first time since announcing it would end — reopen it to new applicants.

U.S. District Judge John D. Bates on Tuesday called the government’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program “virtually unexplained” and therefore “unlawful.” However, he stayed his ruling for 90 days to give the Department of Homeland Security a chance to provide more solid reasoning for ending the program.

READ MORE►


 

Supreme Court declines to enter controversy over ‘dreamers,’ rejects Trump administration’s request to review lower court rulings Photo Credit: Leslie Berestein/KPCC

Here's What You Need to Know About Where DACA Stands

It’s been a time of uncertainty for the roughly 700,000 young unauthorized immigrants enrolled in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program. The Obama-era program, known as DACA, granted temporary work permits and protection from deportation for young adults who arrived in the U.S. as children.

Once someone qualified, that status had to be renewed every two years.

President Trump ended the program in September but called on Congress to find a better solution ahead of March 5. That was supposed to the date beyond which no more renewals could take place.

READ MORE►


 

Supreme Court declines to enter controversy over ‘dreamers,’ rejects Trump administration’s request to review lower court rulings Photo Credit: Joyce Koh/Washington Post

Supreme Court declines to enter controversy over ‘dreamers,’ rejects Trump administration’s request to review lower court rulings

The Supreme Court on Monday declined to enter the national controversy over “dreamers,” turning down the Trump administration’s request to immediately review lower court decisions that keep in place the program that protects undocumented immigrants brought here as children from deportation.

President Trump announced in September that he would let the program expire in March, unless Congress acted. Efforts on Capitol Hill to revive the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program (DACA) as part of a broader deal on immigration policy have failed.

READ MORE►


 

Second federal judge blocks move to end DACA Photo Credit: Molly Adams

Second federal judge blocks move to end DACA

A second federal judge Tuesday has temporarily blocked the Trump administration from ending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

Judge Nicholas G. Garaufis of the US District Court for the Eastern District of New York ruled that DACA participants and states are likely to succeed in their challenge that the way President Donald Trump terminated the Obama-era program was arbitrary and capricious.

Trump last year announced his plan to end DACA, the policy that allowed undocumented immigrants brought to the US as children to stay in the country, effective March 5. That deadline has become central in the congressional debate over immigration, but Democrats and Republicans are nowhere near a breakthrough.

READ MORE►


 

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, who filed one of the federal lawsuits that led to the temporary injunction, said he was confident the courts will uphold the order. Photo Credit: Rich Pedroncelli/Associated Press

Trump administration will ask Supreme Court to allow it to end DACA

The Justice Department on Tuesday said it would take the “rare step” of asking the Supreme Court to overturn a judge’s ruling and clear the way for the Trump administration to dismantle a program that provides work permits to undocumented immigrants who have lived in the United States since childhood.

The Trump administration said it has appealed the judge’s injunction — which said the Obama-era program must continue while a legal challenge to ending it is pending — to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra, who filed one of the federal lawsuits that led to the temporary injunction, said he was confident the courts will uphold the order.

READ MORE►


 

Activists rally on behalf of Dreamers on Jan. 10 outside the New York office of Sen. Charles E. Schumer Photo Credit: Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Government resumes accepting applications to renew DACA

Federal immigration authorities, in a victory for so-called Dreamers, quietly announced they have resumed accepting requests for renewals in DACA, the Obama-era program that shielded hundreds of thousands of young immigrants from deportation.

“Until further notice, if you already applied for #DACA and it was expiring, this is your chance to reapply,” California Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra tweeted Saturday night.

The government’s announcement, made without fanfare on a website Saturday, came four days after a federal judge in San Francisco issued an order temporarily blocking the Trump administration’s decision to phase out the program.

READ MORE►


 

A federal judge blocked the Trump administration's phaseout of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals on Jan. 9. The White House called it Photo Credit: Jenny Starrs/The Washington Post

Federal judge gives respite to ‘dreamers’, says DACA can’t end while lawsuit is pending

A federal judge’s decision to block Trump administration plans to phase out protections for so-called undocumented “dreamers” brought sharp backlash Wednesday from the White House, calling the injunction “outrageous.”

The order by U.S. District Judge William Alsup issued Tuesday says safeguards against deportation must remain in place for the nearly 690,000 immigrants in the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program while a legal challenge to ending the Obama-era program proceeds.

It remained unclear Wednesday when the DACA recipients, also known as “Dreamers” could resume applying for renewals of their work permits as a result of the California ruling, which Alsup said should apply nationwide. Advocates said it would depend on the Department of Homeland Security, which runs the program.

READ MORE►


 

Trump says he's open to a sweeping immigration deal Photo Credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Trump says he's open to a sweeping immigration deal and is willing to 'take the heat' with his supporters

President Trump told lawmakers Tuesday he’d “take the heat” for a comprehensive immigration bill to address the roughly 11 million people in the country illegally — a measure that would test the support of his anti-immigration loyalists.

First, he said, Congress would have to come to a narrower agreement with the administration on border security and on the so-called Dreamers, an estimated 700,000 young people who were brought to the country illegally as children. Then, he said, they could push to deal with the status of the 11 million, he said.

“If you want to take it that further step, I’ll take the heat. I don’t care,” Trump said, quipping, “My whole life has been heat.”

READ MORE►


 

News Archive

 

 

 Important Dates

July

27

Immigration Legal Clinic

Dreamers Resource Center  SA214 |  1 p.m. to 4 p.m.

Click to Register

Tues.

Dreamers Counseling 

Dreamers Resource Center  SA214 |  2 to 3 p.m.

Weds.

DACA Workshops

Dreamers Resource Center  SA214 |  10 a.m. to 12 p.m.