CSULA Student Health Center: Campus Domestic and Sexual Violence

Note: If you need to leave this page quickly, click on escape.

Caution! Computer and Internet activity can be monitored. If you are being abused or stalked it may be safer for you to use a computer a perpetrator does not have access to (e.g., Open Access Lab). If you need to leave this page quickly, click on escape near the top and bottom right of this page and you will be redirected to Google.com. For more information call the National Domestic Violence Hotline (NDVH) at (800) 799-SAFE (7233), (800) 787-3224 (TTY); or visit the National Domestic Violence Hotline or CyberAngels online on a safer computer.

 

Introduction

Sexual assault is the most common violent crime committed on college and university campuses in the U.S. A typical academic year will see 35 of every 1,000 college female students sexually assaulted or raped.2 For a school similar to Cal State L.A. with 12,000 enrolled women this could mean 420 female students sexually assaulted or raped per year. Sexual assault is often linked with dating/domestic violence and stalking.

The highest rates of domestic violence are associated with college age women. Male students are also at risk. Each year in the U.S. about 3,000,000 men are abused by a current or former intimate partner. Because men rarely report sexual assaults the extent of male rape is not known. It is estimated that male students comprise about 10% of collegiate sexual assault victims. The highest stalking victimization rates are experienced by women and men 18-24 years of age.

National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Study

  • 1.3 million women were raped during the year preceding the survey.
  • Nearly 1 in 5 women have been raped during their lifetime while 1 in 71 men have been raped in their lifetime.
  • 1 in 6 women have been stalked during their lifetime. 1 in 19 men have experienced stalking in their lifetime.
  • 1 in 4 women have been the victim of severe physical violence by an intimate partner while 1 in 7 men experienced severe physical violence by an intimate partner.
  • Men and women who experienced these forms of violence were more likely to report frequent headaches, chronic pain, difficulty with sleeping, activity limitations, poor physical health, and poor mental health than men and women who did not experience these forms of violence.

These crimes are a significant enough concern for university students that both federal and state legislation require Cal State L.A. to address these issues in a very specific manner, from education and prevention programming to victim assistance services and perpetrator accountability.

Please take the time to familiarize yourself with the information and resources available through this page, share the information with your friends, and know that the Student Health Center and its Project SAFE collaborators care.

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References

Baum, K., Catalano, S., and Rand, M. (2009). Stalking victimization in the United States. Bureau of Justice Statistics, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved January 15, 2009, from the Bureau of Justice Statistics at http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs

Fisher, B., Cullen, F.T., Turner, M.G. (2000). The sexual victimization of college women. Bureau of Justice Statistics, U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved January 16, 2001, from the Bureau of Justice Statistics at http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/bjs

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (2011). National intimate partner and sexual violence survey. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved March 19, 2012, from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/pdf/NISVS_FactSheet-a.pdf

National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (2006). Understanding intimate partner violence. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved February 12, 2009, from the National Center for Injury Prevention and control at http://www.cdc.gov/ViolencePrevention/index.html

Sampson, R. (2002). Acquaintance rape of college students. Office of Community Oriented Policing Services, U.S. Department of Justice. Retrieved January 7, 2008, from the Office of Community Oriented Policing Services at http://www.cops.usdoj.gov

Project SAFE

This website is an education program of Project SAFE. Project SAFE is a program of the Cal State L.A. Student Health Center's Health Promotion and Education Center, in collaboration with University Police, the University-Student Union's Center for Student Involvement and Cross Cultural Centers; and the East Los Angeles Women's Center.

Project SAFE was originally established through a grant (No. 2002-WA-BX-0012) awarded by the Office on Violence Against Women, Office of Justice Programs, U.S. Department of Justice. Points of view in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the official position or policies of the U.S. Department of Justice.

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