Index

Ecuador Volcanoes Expedition

Welcome to the website for our Ecuador Volcano Expedition, 2010! Thanks to the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Office of Interanational Science and Engineering (OISE) for funding our expedition of discovery. Our team consists of scientists and students from California State University Los Angeles, the University of Wyoming, the University of South Carlolina and the Instituto de Geofisico in Quito Ecuador,teaming up with classrooms in the U.S.A and Ecuador to bring science from the field into the classroom.

 

Questions and Discussions

What are the student's names? (Jeremiah, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

The two students from Cal State L.A. are Ricardo and Jessica. The students from University of Wyoming are Chris and Tim.

What did you find? (2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

We found a lot of old and recent lava flows. Most were made up of a type of rock called andesite.

Can you drop something in the lava and tell me what it does? (Gianna, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Gianna, Lava is so hot if we dropped anything into it, it would melt and we can’t get close enough to it to drop something into it.

Are there caves of lava? (2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Lava can form tubes like caves as it flows away from the volcano. But we did not see any in Ecuador on this trip.

Why is the lava black? (Lily, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Lily,Only some lava types are black, because they contain less silica than other volcanic rocks and have more Iron and Magnesium.

How does lava cool when it is so hot? (2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Like anything when it is hot, after a while it cools down.

How are you going to get the samples? (Gianni, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Gianni, We collect rocks that are already cooled down and break them into smaller pieces to take back with us and study.

How hot can it get when you are near a volcano? (Aubrey, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Aubrey, When we camped near the volcano it is not hot at all, but if you go near the vent it is much hotter.

What are you eating? (Jared, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Jared, In Ecuador we ate fresh fish, rice, chicken, and fresh fruit.

Did you see any lava flows? (2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Yes we saw some flows as recent at 2009, but they are already cooled down and not flowing anymore.

Did anyone get hurt? (Willy, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Willy, Nobody was hurt in the trip because we were very well prepared.

Does lava squirt up like water fountains? (2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Some types of lavas will squirt up like water fountains, but not the ones we saw in Ecuador.

Why did the volcanoes erupt? (2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Volcanoes can erupt for many different reasons. They can erupt from tectonic activity, like earthquakes, or even from the reaction of water combining with magma.

Is the volcano wide? (Jeremiah, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Jeremiah,Some volcanoes are wider than others like the shield volcanoes that make up the Hawaiian Islands.

Can you bring back rocks? (Grant, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Grant,Yes, we brought back close to 100 samples to study.

Does the volcano have a side vent? (Jared, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Jared, One of the volcanoes we studied, Reventador, does have a side vent, which only had one eruption.

How big is the volcano? (David, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

David, Reventador is 1,500 meters high, as big as a mountain.

Are most volcanoes formed in the ocean? (Lily, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Lily, Yes, we would assume so because the earth is covered by 75% water.

Are you in danger? Are you scared? (Hanna, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Hanna, We were not in danger because we were at a safe distance from the volcano. We were not scared, we were very excited.

How many volcanoes have you seen? (Aubrey, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Aubrey, In Ecuador as a group we saw five volcanoes.

Is it fun studying volcanoes? (Gianna, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Gianna, Studying volcanoes is a lot of fun and a great opportunity to travel the world.

What type of volcano is it? (Jared, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Jared, The volcanoes we studied are called strato volcanoes or composite volcanoes.

Why did the volcano over flow? (Gianni, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Gianni, The volcanoes don’t overflow; they just erupt and produce lava that flows out the vent.

How will you tell the different between lava? (Melissa, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Melissa, We know that the older lava flows have more plants growing on them, and newer ones don’t have as many plants.

How close can you get to the lava? (Aidan, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Aidan, Not close enough to touch it because the lava is extremely hot. We stayed at a safe distance from the volcano and the lava.

Is the volcano going to erupt again? (Jacob, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Jacob, Of course the volcano will erupt again. The volcanoes are still active and they will erupt on the near future.

Can volcanoes erupt in more than one way? Can a volcano erupt twice and have a different flow each time? (Luke, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Luke, Volcanoes can erupt in more than one way. Sometimes there is a change in lava type or a different cause for the eruption.

How fast are lava flows in Ecuador? (Grant, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Grant, The volcanoes we visited had very slow moving lava flows.

What is the Ecuador volcano like? Is it really big? Is it really hot there? (Bliss, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Bliss, The volcanoes we visited are very big, but they are not always hot. The climate is humid and rainy all the time.

Why are most of the volcanoes in Hawaii? (Lily, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Lily, The Hawaiian Islands are made up volcanoes, but they are all over the world.

How big is the tallest volcano? (Aubrey, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Aubrey, The tallest volcano is actually an island in Hawaii, Mauna Kea. It is measured to be more than 9000 meters tall from the bottom of the sea floor to 4205 meters above the sea level.

What does Ecuador look like? (David, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

David, Ecuador is very green with jungles and mountains and volcanoes. It also sunny half of the day and raining the other half. The cities are very old and busy with people.

What are you enjoying? (Matt, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Matt, We are all enjoying the people, the scenery, food, rain, wild life and the volcanoes.

How hot is the lava? (Alex, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Alex, Lava can reach temperatures between 1300 F and 2400 F. It will burn anything in its way.

Was it a HUGE explosion? (Willy, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Willy, One of the other volcanoes in Ecuador called Tungurahua did have a big explosion but we did not see it.

How does lava make bubbles? (Jared, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Jared, The bubbles form in lava from the gasses escaping, like in a soda bottle.

Is the volcano deep? (Jeremiah, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Jeremiah, The magma is stored underground untill the volcano erupts. We can't really tell how deep it is based on looking at it.

When you go to volcanoes how many can you out run? (Gianna, 2nd grade, Peninsula Heritage School)

Ginna, Depending on the type of eruption that is occurring, we can out run some kinds of flows. Some flows like the ones in Hawaii can be easily out run, but some flows travel at speeds faster than cars.

 

 

 

image 16

El Reventador Volcano, August 20-08

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