Bahiyyih Hardacre

prof pic
Charter College of Education
Applied and Advanced Studies in Education
Office Location: KH C2059
Phone: 323-343-6181 Email: bhardacre@calstatela.edu

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INTRODUCTION

I am an Assistant Professor in the M.A. in TESOL Program in the division of Applied and Advanced Studies in Education at the Charter College of Education, at California State University, Los Angeles. I am originally from Brazil where I worked as an EFL teacher for 12 years at Binational Centers, at junior high and high schools, and as a certified oral examiner and rater for the University of Cambridge and Michigan ESOL proficiency exams. While residing in the United States for the past 10 years, I have coordinated ESL programs working as Director of Education and Teacher Training at language schools, and taught international students in credit and non-credit programs at the University of California Los Angeles and Santa Monica College. Besides teaching, my main research interests in TESOL and Applied Linguistics are language assessment, language and cognition, language evolution, and neurobiology of language learning and use. 

I am particularly interested in the role of the autonomic nervous system in social engagement behaviors during face-to-face interactions in first and second language production. I make use of psychophysiological and behavioral data in multimodal discourse analysis in order to study language use during communicative events. Communicative behaviors during conversation involve cooperative organization of human language and action, but are also influenced by psychological individual differences and neurophysiological biomarkers such as heart rate variability. Accounting for individual psychophysiological characteristics of the co-participants engaged in a communicaitve event can expand our understanding of linguistic embodiment during such interactions.

I currently serve at the Board of Directors for CATESOL (California and Nevada Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages) as College/ University Level Chair, and as Editor-in-Chief for Issues in Applied Linguistics journal.


EDUCATION

Ph.D. in Applied Linguistics. University of California Los Angeles, 2015.

M.A. in Applied Linguistics & TESL. University of California Los Angeles, 2009.

B.A. in Language and Literature. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (Brazil), 2005.


TESOL

Teaching English and a Second and Foreign Language (TESFL) Certificate, 2009. University of California Los Angeles.

Teaching Knowledge Test (TKT), 2006. University of Cambridge.

Cambridge In-service Certificate in English Language Teaching (ICELT), 2005 (awarded with ‘Distinction’). University of Cambridge.

Cambridge ESOL Oral Examiner Certification, 2005. University of Cambridge.

ACE ELT Teaching Certificate, 2004. Rhodes University.

Cambridge ESOL: Reading and Writing Skills, 2004. University of Cambridge.

Cambridge ESOL: Speaking and Listening Skills, 2004. University of Cambridge.


TEACHING INTERESTS

My teaching interest lies on current language testing issues and on using discourse analysis in first and second language research as well as classroom research; I am also interested inpedagogical classes in Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language that focus on grammar and pronunciation. 


RESEARCH

Behavioral and Psychophysiological Correlates of Conversation

UCLA IRB#11-002367

June 2011-May 2015

Position: Study and Lab Coordinator

Principal Investigator: Dr. John Schumann, UCLA Department Applied Linguistics

Co-investigator: Dr. David Shapiro, UCLA Department Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Studies

Funded by: UCLA Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research & UCLA Academic Senate Council on Research

Summary: From the perspective of turn-taking and decision-making, casual conversation is anything but casual. Such subtle behaviors that take place during ordinary conversation are reflected in measures of peripheral nervous system activity. Therefore, I examine how changes in heart rate (HR) and skin conductance (SC) correlate with such behaviors. Changes in HR and SC often precede, coincide with, or follow a particular segment of interaction that conversational analysts have identified as characteristic of talk-in-interaction (for example, hesitation markers, a transition relevance place, a perturbation (to get an interlocutor’s attention), a hedge, a self repair or self correction, a sound stretch (to provide emphasis), a pitch peak (to signal the end of the turn), a rush through or speed up in speech (to indicate that the speaker is about to give up his turn but has something additional he wants to say), or a fill-in (where the speaker invites the recipient to take the floor).  Finally, correlated physiological measurements comprise a well-established research methodology in the field of social psychology and biobehavioral studies.

Discourse Analysis and Autonomic Responsivity

UCLA IRB#11-002212

Fall 2010-May 2011

Position: Principal Investigator

Funded by the UCLA Center for Culture, Brain, & Development

Summary: The main objective of the study was to investigate the role of autonomic regulation, or physiological regulation of the heart, during dyadic social conversation, and how the conversational rules relate to physiological changes. Heart rate was monitored through the use of Polar Heart Monitors RS800CX on each participant.


PUBLICATIONS AND PRESENTATIONS

PUBLICATIONS

Hardacre, B. (2017). Do Psychophysiological Individual Differences Affect Turn-Taking Behavior During Group Conversation? Manuscript in preparation.

Hardacre, B. (2017). The Embodiment of Talk: Using Psychophysiological Methods to Better Understand Linguistics Behaviors. Lexington Books. Manuscript in preparation.

Hardacre, B., Guvendir, E., (2017). Cognitive perspectives in teaching speaking. The TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

Guvendir, E., Hardacre, B. (2017). Listening and different age groups. The TESOL Encyclopedia of English Language Teaching. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

Hardacre Cerqueira, B. (2015). Behavioral and psychophysiological correlates of conversation. Doctoral dissertation. Retrieved from http://escholarship.org/uc/item/360049nd

Hardacre, B. (2013). The Biological and Psychological Correlates of Social Engagement Behaviors in Second Language Acquisition. In A. Joaquin & J. Schumann (Eds.) Exploring the Interactional Instinct. Foundations of Human Interaction Series. OUP.

Hardacre, B. Carris, L. (2011). The UCLA Test of Oral Proficiency: A model for assessing and addressing English proficiency of international teaching assistants. N. Avineri (Panel Moderator) Language Assessment as a System: Best Practices, Stakeholders, Models, and Testimonials. Issues in Applied Linguistics, vol 18(2).

Hardacre Cerqueira, B. (2009). The biological and psychological correlates of social engagement behaviors in second language acquisition. Unpublished MA thesis. University of California, Los Angeles.

Hardacre, B. (2009). The Interactional Instinct [Review of the book Interactional Instinct: The evolution and acquisition of language, by N. Lee et al]. Issues in Applied Linguistics, vol 17(2).

Guvendir, E., Hardacre, B. (2009). Increasing Adult Second Language Learning Efficiency Through the Stimulus of the Dopamine Reward System to Counterbalance Decrease in Plasticity After Critical Period Age”, 7th Annual Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities Proceedings pp. 2291-2302.

Hardacre, B. (2008). Once and Future Directions in Language Teaching and Life: an interview with Marianne Celce-Murcia. Issues in Applied Linguistics, vol 16(2).

PAPER PRESENTATIONS

Hardacre, B. (2017, March). The role of psychophysiological individual differences in turn-taking and holding the floor. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Applied Linguistics, Portland, OR.

Hardacre, B. (2017, March). How to get published in ESOL and applied linguistics serials. Workshop and panel at the annual meeting of the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), Seattle, WA.

Hardacre, B. (2016, March). The role of psychological and neurophysiological individual differences in the dynamics of group conversation. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Applied Linguistics, Orlando, FL.

Hardacre, B. (2015, March). How to get published in ESOL and applied linguistics serials. Workshop and panel at the annual meeting of the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), Toronto, Canada.

Hardacre, B. (2014, March). The deafening loudness of silence: Increased physiological responsivity during inter-turn silence in small group conversations. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Applied Linguistics, Portland, OR.

Hardacre, B. (2014, March). How to get published in ESOL and applied linguistics serials. Workshop and panel at the annual meeting of the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), Portland, OR.

Hardacre, B. (2013, June). The physiology of embodiment: Using heart rate and skin conductance in the study of communicative behaviors during social engagements. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Association for Cross-Cultural Psychology, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA.

Hardacre, B. (2013, March). Neurophysiology in multi-modal analysis of language use in small group interactions. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Applied Linguistics, Dallas, TX.

Hardacre, B. (2012, November). Neurobiological correlates of social engagement behaviors in small group interactions. Paper presented at the biological anthropology section of the annual meeting of the American Anthropological Association, San Francisco, CA.

Hardacre, B., Schumann, J. (2012, March). Pushing the boundaries of conversation analysis: Making use of heart rate and skin conductance in applied linguistics research. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Applied Linguistics, Boston, MA.

Hardacre, B. (2012, March). Physiology and conversation analysis. Paper presented at the Discourse, Communication, and Conversation Conference, Loughborough University, Loughborough, England.

Hardacre, B. (2011, March). Psychological and physiological correlates of social engagement behaviors in second language acquisition. In J. S. Schumann (Chair), The interactional instinct and second language acquisition. Symposium conducted at the annual meeting of the American Association of Applied Linguistics, Chicago, IL.

Hardacre, B. (2009, November). Oversized classes, funds gone? Classroom management strategies on a budget. Workshop conducted at the CATESOL Regional Conference, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA.

Hardacre, B. (2009, October). Biological basis of social engagement behaviors in second language acquisition. Paper presented at the Encultured Brain Conference, Notre Dame University, South Bend, IN.

Hardacre, B. (2009, January). Increasing adult second language learning efficiency through the stimulus of the dopamine reward system to counterbalance decrease in plasticity after critical period age. Paper presented at the annual conference of the Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities, Honolulu, HI.

Hardacre, B. (2007). Technology: An aid from A to T. Paper presented at the Latin America English Culture Conference, São Paulo, Brazil.

GUEST SPEAKER PRESENTATIONS

August 2017 - Title: “Psychophysiological Methods in Language Acquisition Research.” Invited by the Multicultural Education Conference in Anaheim (MECA).

May 2017 - Title: "Psychophysiology and Linguistic Embodiment." Invited for the Linguistics in Practice Institute, California State University, Northridge.

March 2017 - Title: "Psychophysiological Methods in Applied Linguistics Research." Invited by Stephanie Kim, California State University, Northridge - Course: Survey in Applied Linguistics.

June 2012 - Title: “When the Framework Doesn’t Fit: Dealing with Resistant Audiences and Methodologies in Applied Linguistic Research” (Co-presenter: Jeremy C. Kelley). Invited by Lyle Bachman and John Schumann, University of California at Los Angeles - Course: Introduction to Doctoral Studies in Applied Linguistics.

March 2012 - Title: “Exploring Physiological Correlates of Conversation.” Invited by John Schumann, University of California at Los Angeles - Course: Foundations of Language Acquisition. 

January 2012 – Title: “Transdisciplinary Research Methods in Applied Linguistics.” Invited by Anna Dina Joaquin, California State University at Northridge - Course: Survey in Applied Linguistics.