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February 17, 2005

Examining the processes occurring in thunderstorms that affect soluble, reactive species (chemical reservoir species)
Marco Orozco
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry
sim70@hotmail.com, and Barth Mary, National Center for Atmospheric Research

Because many natural occurring chemical reactions can produce compounds that cause health problems as well as affect global climate, it is important to study the processes that affect the chemical compounds in the atmosphere. One major gap in our knowledge of atmospheric chemistry is the effect of clouds on the chemical environment. A recent intercomparison of convective-scale cloud chemistry models has shown that transport of passive tracers from the boundary layer to the upper troposphere Because many natural occurring chemical reactions can produce compounds that cause health problems as well as affect global climate, it is important to study the processes that affect the chemical compounds in the atmosphere. One major gap in our knowledge of atmospheric chemistry is the effect of clouds on the chemical environment. Three chemical species of interest are nitric acid (HNO3), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and formaldehyde (CH2O). These chemical reservoir species are important because of the roles they play in both NOx and HOx (ozone precursors) and they as well are reactive and soluble in clouds. In this study, we examine possible reasons for the differences in HNO3, H2O2, and CH2O mixing ratios among the convective-scale cloud chemistry models. The reactions added and changes to the models will be described and their out come will be discussed in this paper.

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