Web Publishing with Netscape Navigator Gold 3.0

Web Publishing with Netscape Navigator Gold 3.0
(Part 3)
 

This training material is taught based on the book, Official Netscape Navigator Gold 3.0 Book, Windows Edition, by Alan Simpson, Copyright © 1996 Ventana Communications Group, Inc. The book is available at any bookstore. It is compiled and taught by Albert Tran, the Library Information Technology Consultant.

Table of Contents

Chapter 6 - Adding Hyperlinks 

Chapter 7 - Get It Straight With Tables
Chapter 6 - Adding Hyperlinks

What's A Hyperlink?

A hyperlink is a "hot spot" in a Web page. When you click on a hyperlink, your browser takes you to some other page on the World Wide Web. You've no doubt come across dozens of hyperlinks in your own Web browsing. Some hyperlinks are colored, underlined text. Some pictures act as hyperlinks.

About URLs

Every site on the WWW has its own unique address, or URL. Each page on the Web also has its own URL. The specific page is identified by the URL, followed by a slash and the name of the page. For example: /sites/default/files/library/idnex.htm.

Local Versus Remote Links

When you create a hyperlink, you can have the link point to a page in your own Web site. That kind of link is called a local link.Or, you can have the hyperlink point to someone else's Web site. And that kind of link is called a remote link.

Following are the "official" names of the different parts of a URL, and the assumptions Navigator makes when told to go to a URL:

  • Protocol: The first part of the name of the protocol, which defines how information in the URL is to be accessed.
  • Host Name: the second part of the URL is the host name, the name of the computer as the Internet sees it.
  • Directory: If the URL refers to a particular directory on the host computer, the directory path follows the host name. When the directory path is omitted in a local link, the current document is assumed; in a remote link, the default page for that server is assumed.
  • Filename: the filename portion, if any, of the URL refers to a specific file. When the filename is omitted in a local link, the current document is assumed; in a remote link, the default page for that server is assumed.
  • Target: If the URL points to a specific target in a page, that target name appears at the end of the URL, preceded by a pound (#) symbol. When no target is specified, the top of the page is assumed.
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Adding Targets To Your Pages

Adding a target to a Web page is easy. Just follow these steps:
  1. Open, in Gold's editor, the page in which you want to place the named target.
  2. Move the cursor to the location at which you want to place the target.
  3. Optionally, select a small chunk of text (up to 30 characters) that will act as the target name.
  4. Click the Insert Target (Named Anchor) button in the Character Format toolbar. Or choose Insert | Target (Named Anchor). You'll see the simple dialog box.
  5. If you selected text in Step 3, that text appears in the dialog box. You can use that text as the anchor name or, if you want to use a different name, just type that name (up to 30 characters).
  6. Choose OK.
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Adding Hyperlinks

To add the hyperlinks, follow these steps:
  1. Select the text or picture that will act as the hot spot. (To select a picture, just click it once.)
  2. Click the Make Link button in the Character Format toolbar, or choose Insert | Link.
  3. Next, specify where you want this link to take the reader, as follows:
  • If you're linking the reader to a different Web site, type the complete URL of that site under Link to a page location or local file.
  • If you're linking the reader to a another page in this site, click the Browse File button and then, in the Link to File dialog box that appears, select (open) the file you want to link to.
  • If you're linking to a target in the current page, leave the Link to a page location or local file option blank, and just select (click) the named target that you want this link to point to.
  • Choose OK.
  • Linking To A Target In A Different Page

    To link to a specific target in some page other than the one you're editing at the moment, you must include both the filename and the target name in your selection.

    Drag-And-Drop Hyperlinks

    You can use some great drag-and-drop shortcuts to create links in your own pages.
    • Open another Navigator window (File | New Web Browser).
    • Get online, and use one of the windows to browse the Web.
    • Leave the document you're editing in the other window.
    • When you come to a site to which you'd like to create a hyperlink, point to the little link icon next to the Location box in the browsing window.
    • Drag that little icon into the Web page you're editing.
    • You can also drag a link from a bookmark window, newsgroup, or mail window to create a link to that URL.

    Changing or Delecting A Hyperlink

    Should you need to change or delete a hyperlink, just right-click that link (in the editor) and choose Link Properties. Make you change in the Link Properties dialog box, then click on OK.

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    Adding A "Hot" Return Address

    To put a "hot" return address at the bottom of a Web page, select the text that will act as the link, then click the Make Link button. In the Link to a page location or local file box, type mailto: followed by your e-mail address.

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    Chapter 7- Get It Straight With Tables

    What's A Table?

    A table in a Web page is just like a table in a book or any other printed document-it is used to align text into rows and columns. You are not limited to putting text in a table. You can put pictures in as well-even pictures that act as hyperlinks.

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    Table Jargon

    Rows go across the table, columns go up and down. The place at which a row and column meet is called a cell. The lines that separate the cells are called borders. A table's caption is a line of descriptive text above or below the table. Tables can also have header cells, which are the same as any other cells except that text within the header cells is automatically centered and boldfaced.

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    How To Create A Table

    To create a table open your Web page in Gold's editor. Click approximately where you want the table to appear. If you need some extra space above the table, you can add some blank lines by pressing Enter as many times as necessary. Then follow these steps:
    1. Choose Insert | Table from the menus. The Create Table dialog box appears.
    2. Specify the number of rows and columns you want the table to contain.
    3. You can choose other options if you wish.
    4. Click the OK button.
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    Filling A Table

    After you've created a table, you can easily start filling it. Just click the cell where you want to type something, and start typing. Or, if you want to insert a picture, click the cell and then click the Insert Image button. The height and width of the row and column grow, as necessary, to accommodate what you put into the cell. As you fill other cells, some columns may shrink to balance out the column widths.

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    Selecting & Editing Within A Table

    To select a graphic image, click it once. A dark border appears around the image. To select text, just drag the mouse pointer through the text you want to select. After you have selected a picture or text, you can perform most of the normal formatting and editing operations on it.

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    Formatting A Table

    To format the table as a whole, click anywhere in the table and choose Properties | Table from the menus. A table dialog box appears.

    Brief descriptions of the options in the the dialog box follow:

    • Border line width: Defines the width of the border around the table, in pixels. Setting this value to zero hides the borders.
    • Cell spacing: Provides extra spacing, measured in pixels, between the cells.
    • Cell padding: Defines a margin, measured in pixels, within the cells.
    • Table width: Defines the width of the table. When this option is not checked, the table automatically widens to accommodate its contents.
    • Table min. height: Defines the minimum height of the table. If this option is not checked, the table height is determined automatically, based on its contents.
    • Table color: If this option is not checked, the table is transparent. If checked, you can click the Choose button to define a color for the table.
    • Include caption: If this option is checked, an extra row is added to the table to accommodate a caption. You can choose to place this row above or below the table.
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    Formatting Rows

    The row-formatting options let you align text within cells and choose colors for individual rows. To format one or more rows, follow these steps:
    1. Click anywhere in the row you want to format, or select multiple rows to format.
    2. Choose Properties | Row from the menu bar to get to the Row dialog box.
    3. Choose options for Horizontal and Vertical text alignment, and (optionally) a color for the selected row(s).
    4. Click on the OK button.
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    Formatting Cells

    You can format individual cells or groups of cells. Click the cell you want to format, or select the cells you want to format. Then choose Properties | Cell from the menu bar to get to the Cell dialog box. Summaries of the options in that dialog box follow:
    • Cell spans: Makes a cell span two or more rows, or two or more columns.
    • Text alignment: Overrides the table and row formatting, if any, for the currently selected cell(s) only.
    • Text: Header style automatically centers and boldfaces text in the cell. Wrap text, when disable, prevents text from word-wrapping within the cell.
    • Cell width, min. height, color: Same as equivalent options in the Table dialog box, but applied only to the currently selected cell(s). Changing the width of a cell sets the width of the entire column.
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    Inserting & Deleting Rows & Columns

    You can easily insert and delete entire rows and columns in a table. First, click anywhere in the row or column you want to delete, or where you want to insert a row or column. Then:
    • To insert a row or column, select Insert from the menu bar and choose either Row or Column.
    • To delete the row or column, click on Properties in the menu bar, then choose Delete Row or Delete Column.
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    Spanning Rows & Columns

    A single cell can span two or more rows, or two or more columns-which allows you to do some neat formatting tricks. To make a cell span more (or fewer) rows and columns:.
    1. Click anywhere in the cell that you want to expand or shrink.
    2. Choose Properties | Cell to get to the Cell dialog box.
    3. In the Cell spans options, specify the number of row(s) and the number of column(s) that you want the cell to span.
    4. Choose OK.
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    Last updated: August 18, 1997