Office of Student Services FAQ

Directed Teaching About Elementary and Single Subject Directed Teaching

What do I do once I get my placement?

  • We recommend that you visit your assigned school site in advance. Meet the assistant principal or our contact with the school and find out how to receive an id badge and how to sign in each and every day.
  • You should find the best travel routes and determine where you can park before the first day of directed teaching.
  • You can introduce yourself to your Master Teacher(s), receive any materials to help you prepare, and observe the classroom if you have time. Please set up a formal meeting with your master teacher before your visit. Master Teachers have busy teaching schedules and should never be interrupted while teaching or without notice. Please give your Master Teacher a copy of the Master Teacher handbook and these frequently asked questions or the following website link:

http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/ccoe/off_studentservices_dt.htm

When should I start my assignment?

You must start your assignment on the date assigned to you by the Office of Student Services. Call the school for the start time and get there early on the first day. Student teachers, who without permission, do not appear at their school site the first assigned day of student teaching, will have their directed teaching assignment terminated. This termination will constitute a failure of one quarter of directed teaching.

What is the attendance policy?

These attendance policies apply to both student teachers working in a master teacher's classroom and student teachers that are teachers of record in their own classrooms. Directed Teaching is for at least 10 weeks, usually all 11 weeks, of a full quarter.

  •  Daily Schedules:You are responsible for being present at your assigned school site each and every day of student teaching following the required contract hours of teachers at your school.
  • Absentee and Tardy Policies:You may only miss two days during the entire quarter (this includes teachers of record as well). Missing more than two days will most likely result in a failure of student teaching. More than two late arrivals or early leavingsmay also lead to the failure of student teaching.
  • Sign in Policies:For students working with one or more master teachers:

If required, you should follow the school's required sign-in procedures for visitors. You MUSTalso sign in and out each day with your Master Teacher, who must also sign the attendance sheet. You will receive this attendance sheet during the first week of your directed teaching seminar.

For students who are teachers of record in their own classrooms:

You are expected to follow school sign in policies. We reserve the right to see your sign-in sheet should we suspect you of missing more than the allowed two days.

  • Unusual Schedules:You must also be present at the school site during standardized testing, benchmark testing, field trips, final exams, and other days that result in different schedules. You will benefit from learning how to administer standardized tests and exams and can use any additional non-instructional time for long term planning, tutoring, and other school site activities.
  • Whom do I notify if I need to miss a day of student teaching and what are my responsibilities for a missed day?

During your first week of school, you should exchange phone numbers with your Master Teacher and University Field Supervisor along with email addresses. If you know in advance you will be absent on a particular day, let both know and leave a lesson plan if you were responsible for teaching that day.

If you have an emergency the night before or morning of a school day, you must personally notify your Master Teacher and find a way to get a lesson plan to the teacher. Once you are teaching full time, you are as responsible for lesson planning as any regular teacher. It is unprofessional to leave your master teacher without a viable lesson plan.

If my Master Teacher is absent, must I go to school?

  • Yes, you must go to your school site with one exception. If your teacher is attending a professional development workshop and you are allowed to go, you may also attend. You must notify your Supervisor if this attendance interferes with your observation schedule.
  • If your teacher is out for any other reason, you must go to the school site. The school will most likely place a substitute in the room. You can negotiate with the substitute, if you are ready, whether you teach the lesson for the day or not. State law prevents you from being the paid substitute for the day in that room. If the school site asks you to do so, you must contact your University Field Supervisor or the Office of Student Services immediately.

Do I have to attend school site professional development meetings?

  • Early release days or late start days.YES. Many schools release students early one day a week or start late so that teachers can attend professional development or staff meetings. You must attend those meetings, as they are part of the regular, contractual school day. Ask your Master Teacher to arrange permission for you to attend these meetings.
  • Pupil free days.YES. Often, teachers get pupil-free days to meet for professional development or for parent conferences. You must also attend those days as they fall into the regular school calendar.
  • After school meetings.IDEALLY. Occasionally, schools have after-school professional development or teacher meetings. If that event interferes with your CSULA seminar or work schedule, you do not have to attend these school-based meetings. But you should try at least once during student teaching to attend after school events.

For teachers of record working in their own classrooms:

Yes to all three with one possible exception:

Of course, you must attend early release or late start and pupil free days. However, occasionally, after school meetings may interfere with your directed teaching seminar. You should immediately let your school site administrator know of the conflict as our directed teacher seminar professors have attendance requirements they will not and cannot waive for teachers of record. School site administrators are supposed to support your completion of your credential. Show them your syllabus, if necessary.

What is my required daily teaching schedule?

You are responsible for being at your assigned school site all day long for at least 10 weeks though most assignments are 11 weeks long. It is not up to you to decide or negotiate your schedules with your Master Teachers or school sites. It is not up to you to decide how long your placement will last.

You and your Master Teacher will negotiate an instructional schedule. You are responsible for giving your Master Teacher a copy of the Master Teacher Handbook the first day of directed teaching or for referring them to the link on the Office of Student Services Website. Many have not worked with CSULA students in the past, so this handbook will help them understand our expectations. You can find this handbook: http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/ccoe/studserv/roles.pdf

Typically students observe the first and/or second week and pick up a class or content area to cover each following week so that by week five or six, students are teaching a full day (or at a minimum 80% of a school day).

Secondary

Secondary student teachers must cover 80% of master teachers’ instructional schedules, which equals four to five periods per traditional school day plus a planning period.

Of course, taking over classes depends on the relationship that develops between the master teacher(s) and student teacher….but typically….

We recommend this timeline:

Week One-Observe…help with small groups, tutor, etc.

Week Two-Start teaching one class. You can co-plan with the master teacher

Week Three-Start teaching a second class

Week Four-Start teaching a third class

Week Five-Start teaching a fourth class or the entire schedule if no AP classes

Weeks Six to Eleven-Take over entire schedule
 

Elementary

Elementary student teachers will build to taking over all responsibilities of the master teacher.

We recommend this timeline:

Week One- Observe…help with small groups, tutor, etc.

Week Two-Conducting class business (attendance, lunch count, bring students from recess, line up, dismissal, etc.); Learning student’s names; Becoming familiar with class procedures, materials, and schedule(s); Observing and reflecting on Master/Cooperating teacher’s model lessons then discuss at the end of each day or at the end of the first Friday; Teaching a reading group, including follow-up; Conducting the read-aloud story time; Working with small groups or individual students, providing additional; assistance in math, language arts, etc.; Preparing to take responsibility for another subject.

Weeks Three and Four-Continuing with above and welcoming students at the beginning of the day, recess, lunch, etc., Spelling Test, Art or Music Lesson. Adding another curricular area such as Math; Preparing to teach a lesson in social studies, science, or health unit next.

During the week; Meeting with Master/Cooperating teacher after each lesson taught by the student teacher to discuss strengths and needs for improvement.

Week Five-Teaching at least four subjects on a regular basis or as a team teacher with the Master/Cooperating teacher such as Reading or Language lessons, math lessons, Physical Education lessons, etc. ; Teaching a science lesson, cultural, social or ecological lesson; Designing a bulletin board; Gradually adding additional subjects on a more consistent basis; Ready to teach a total group lesson: art music, P.E., core literature.

Weeks Six and Seven-Assuming additional content areas; Becoming familiar with specific student learning levels; Meeting with Master/Cooperating teacher consistently to reflect on lesson strengths and needs improvement.

Week Nine and Ten-Preparing and assuming full responsibility for the classroom and instruction

Must I lesson plan every day?

  • For traditional student teachers working with one or more master teachers:

YES, in fact, you are not allowed to teach any lesson or part of a lesson without a lesson plan. Your Master Teacher may or may not ask for one and may or may not use one him or herself. Regardless, you must plan. You should ask if your Master Teacher has a preference. If not, use a lesson plan format you learned in our program (See Appendix A for ideas). If you do not know how to do an appropriate lesson plan, let your supervisor or Seminar instructor know immediately.

  • For teachers of record working in their own classrooms:

Even if no one at your school site asks to see your lessons, we expect you to plan each and every day. You may follow the lesson plan standard of your school site but there should be enough details that an observer/evaluator can understand each and every step of your instructional plan for the lesson.

Who evaluates me?

For all student teachers

Your university field supervisor will observe/evaluate you at least four times. If you have not heard from your supervisor by the end of your second week of student teaching, contact the Office of Student Services. Please keep all copies of observations and mid-term and final evaluations. You will need them for your portfolio and later many districts and school sites ask to see them during their interview processes.

For traditional student teachers working with one or more master teachers

You have two evaluators: your master teacher and your university field supervisor. After each university field supervisor observation, you will receive written feedback. You will also receive two formal evaluations: a mid-term and a final evaluation. Your master teacher will also provide two formal evaluations: a mid-term and a final evaluation.

For teachers of record working in their own classrooms

You have two evaluators: your administrator (principal or vice-principal) and university field supervisor. After each university field supervisor observation, you will receive written feedback. You will also receive two formal evaluations: a mid-term and a final evaluation. Your administrator will also provide one formal evaluation: a final evaluation. You must give your administrator the evaluation forms which your field supervisor will provide. You must also collect the completed forms to give to your supervisor as requested.

Note: If you are absent for a planned university field supervisor observation and you do not notify your supervisor in advance, you will fail that observation. The university field supervisor is under no obligation to make up that observation.

What if I am concerned with my placement?

The Office of Student Services spends a considerable amount of time arranging placements and developing partnerships with districts and schools. As much as we try to honor your first or second choice, we cannot always do so as districts and schools do not always accept our placement requests. Only under extenuating circumstances will we change placements. You are only to notify officials in Student Services at CSULA of your request. You are NOT to make any contacts with other classrooms or schools on your own behalf.

We know that in rare occurrences matches between student teacher and Master Teacher are a challenge. If you have concerns with your placement within the first two weeks of your placement, discuss the issues with your supervisor. Do not discuss any issues with anyone at your school site. You are not to initiate any change of Master Teachers. If you have not been assigned a supervisor, contact the Office of Student Services during the first week of the quarter. Remember, that we cannot guarantee a new placement during the same quarter and will not move teachers after the second week of directed teaching. We also do not change sites should you receive an unsatisfactory mid-term evaluation.

How should I dress? Is there a standard CSULA dress code?

As long as you are a student in our credential program, we require you to dress professionally for your position. While CSULA does not have a formal dress code, we do have certain expectations about professional attire.

This holds true for all student teachers. Many of you are young and often blend in with students. Please dress so we, parents, students, teachers, and all other adults at your school site can distinguish you from your students. Even if your master teacher dresses very casually, we ask that you dress professionally.

Our dress code expectations are as follows:

  1. You must wear proper shirts (no t-shirts or low cut tops) and trousers (no blue jeans).
  2. You must wear closed shoes and no sneakers for non PE teachers.
  3. Of course, PE, Art, and Industrial Technology teachers should dress appropriately for your courses.
  4. If you know that you are doing an activity that may result in a mess, we recommend lab coats and aprons.

We are not necessarily requiring coat and ties or skirts and dresses. We want you to be comfortable but professional. For people on a budget, thrift stores often have great clothes for reasonable prices.

How will I know if I did not pass student teaching?

You will know by the end of the quarter if you did not pass student teaching. Our directed teaching forms are credit/no credit. You must receive passing evaluations from both your master teacher and University Field Supervisor with no "no credit" anywhere on either evaluation. If you receive a failing mid-term evaluation by week five or six of the quarter, that does not mean you will automatically fail, but it does mean that without significant changes, you may very well not pass. You may also fail without receiving a failing mid-term evaluation. On rare occasions, school sites may ask you to leave for not meeting their expectations. We cannot and do not question their decisions and view removals as a failure.

We have very specific policies for repeating student teaching. Cal State LA allows a maximum of three attempts at Directed Teaching. A successful quarter is defined as a full quarter of directed teaching and evidence of attainment of all directed teaching competencies. Placements that are terminated at any time during the quarter because of a student's unacceptable teaching, management, behavior, or professionalism are considered one failed attempt. Should this termination occur, the Office of Student Services will provide you with further policy details.

JYou (and we) are guests at school sites, and we will never argue or dispute with a school site about their decisions to terminate a placement.

What TPA Tasks must I complete during direct teaching? What do I do if I fail the TPA tasks for Block 4?

All students who entered Block 1 of our credential program during or after the Fall of 2008 must complete four TPA Tasks along with fulfilling the other requirements for receiving a preliminary teaching credential. Elementary student teachers must pass Task 4 of the TPAs during their directed teaching block. Secondary student teachers must pass Tasks 3 and 4 of the TPAs during their directed teaching block. Remember, neither your seminar teachers nor your supervisors grade these tasks. Our secondary program expanded its directed teaching seminar to four units to help support students with their completion of their final two TPA tasks.

You are responsible for completing all the requirements of the tasks and for pacing yourself through directed student to ensure you enroll in the tasks early in the quarter and then submit them and their required supporting materials by midnight of Sunday of the beginning of week 8 of the quarter. If you do not pass or even submit your TPAs during your directed teaching quarter, you will not be able to receive your credential at the completion of the directed teaching.

Students who fail their TPAs will have through the first three weeks of the following full instructional quarter to submit their new TPAs, while those who did not submit TPAs will have to wait until the week 8 deadline to submit their TPAs.

It is imperative you schedule your time to complete and pass the TPAs!!! Within the first two weeks, you should select the class you plan to use for your TPAs and identify your focus students. You should share the task requirements with your master teacher and plan for your Task 3 assessment lesson and your Task 4 videotaping.

How do I balance Directed Teaching and TPA Task Completion?

You may not use the TPAs as an excuse not to plan, and you may not using planning as an excuse not to complete the TPAs. The earlier you begin, the easier the process will become.

Here is a link to our website that provides detailed information about the TPAs.

http://www.calstatela.edu/academic/ccoe/div_edci_tpa_index.htm

Here are two detailed weekly schedules for balancing TPA and Directed Teaching Completion.

a. Elementary -

Sample timeline - after each of the following weeks, the student should be:

  

1st week

  • Conducting class business (attendance, lunch count, bring students from Recess, line up, dismissal, etc.)
  • Learning student’s names
  • Becoming familiar with class procedures, materials, and schedule(s)
  • Observing and reflecting on Master/Cooperating teacher’s model lessons then discuss at the end of each day or at the end of the first Friday
  • Teaching a reading group, including follow-up
  • Conducting the read-aloud story time
  • Working with small groups or individual students, providing additional assistance in math, language arts, etc.

· Preparing to take responsibility for another subject

2nd week

  • Continuing above
  • Welcoming students at the beginning of the day, recess, lunch, etc.
  • Spelling Test, Art or Music lesson
  • Adding another curricular area such as math
  • Preparing to teach a lesson from social studies, science or health unit next week
  • Meeting with Master/Cooperating teacher after each lesson taught by the student teacher to discuss strengths and needs for improvement
  • Selecting class and focus students for TPA Task 4
  • Beginning collect class and individual student data for TPA Task 4

4th week

  • Teaching at least four subjects on a regular basis or as a team teacher with the Master/Cooperating teacher such as Reading or Language lessons, math lessons, Physical Education lessons, etc.
  • Teaching a science lesson, cultural, social or ecological lesson
  • Designing a bulletin board
  • Gradually adding additional subjects on a more consistent basis
  • Ready to teach a total group lesson: art, music, P.E., core literature
  • Developing your TPA Task 4 lesson
  • Sending home TPA Task 4 permission slips for filming, if required by school

5th-7th weeks

  • Assuming additional content areas
  • Becoming familiar with specific student learning levels
  • Meeting with Master/Cooperating teacher consistently to reflect on lesson strengths and needs of improvement
  • Teaching and videotaping your TPA Task 4 lesson
  • Gathering the student work required for your TPA Task 4 lesson
  • Writing and editing your TPA as well as scanning your student work and lesson materials as well as uploading you’re your final Task 4 write-up as well as TPA video to Taskstream.

8th and 9th week

  • Submitting your TPA Task 4 by midnight of Sunday before week 8 begins
  • Preparing to assume full responsibility for the classroom and instruction. This is the time the Student Teacher implements what has been learned throughout the formal course work and field experience. After having apprenticed with a Master/Cooperating teacher for approximately eight weeks, the Student Teacher is ready to apply this knowledge and practice within an autonomous environment. The unique personality of the Student Teacher and the newly acquired teaching strategies can now be implemented.

b.Single Subject -

Sample timeline - after each of the following weeks, the student should be:

  

1st week

  • Observing the class
  • Conducting class business (attendance, collect and track homework, etc.)
  • Assuming responsibility for tutoring individual students (e.g., writing skills, reading comprehension, note-taking or other study skills, or instruction that is content specific to the lesson/subject or unit being studied)
  • Assuming responsibility for a small group instruction, as above
  • Preparing to take responsibility for the whole subject in the particular unit that is being presented to the class
  • Sharing TPA Tasks 3 and 4 with your master teacher

2nd week

  • Continuing to assume responsibility for a small group instruction
  • Adding another portion of the different details of the Unit
  • Preparing lesson plans and teaching designated lessons as part of the unit
  • Preparing some assessment activities to measure comprehension in the subject area of the material taught
  • Selecting your class and focus students for TPA Tasks 3 and 4
  • Gathering class information for both tasks
  • Beginning to attend professional development, grade level, small learning community, and departmental meetings

3rd week

  • Planning for and teaching 1st class at the assigned times (scheduled with the master teacher and, as appropriate, with the university supervisor)
  • Adding more assessment measures
  • Preparing information for the following units and the necessary activities
  • Attending school and community events
  • Collecting focus student information for pre assessment and pre-videotaping portions of TPA Tasks
  • Sending home permission letter for videotaping portion of TPA Task 4

4th week

  • Assuming full responsibility for at least two classes
  • Collecting and grading all student work from the classes you teach
  • Planning lessons for each and every day that include multiple instructional methods
  • Planning specific lesson for TPA Task 3 assessment
  • Collecting student work for 2 focus students and 3 representative students

5th-6th weeks

  • Assuming full responsibility for at least three classes and then by week six at least 80% of teacher’s instructional load
  • Meeting with students before and after class for remediation or enrichment
  • Meeting with and/or calling parents of students with particular needs
  • Writing up your entire TPA Task 3 and scanning all materials into Taskstream
  • Planning lesson to videotape for TPA Task 4
  • Videotaping yourself teaching. Re-tape, if necessary.
  • Collecting all the student work and instructional materials required for TPA Task 4

7th Week

  • Continuing to teach your complete instructional load
  • Finalizing your write up of TPA Task 4
  • Working with peer editing partners for both Tasks.
  • Uploading your video and other supporting materials to Taskstream
  • Uploading your final TPA Tasks 3 and 4 to Taskstream
  • Submitting by midnight of Sunday before week 8 of the quarter

8th-11th weeks

  • Continuing to develop short and long term lessons
  • Beginning to gather all materials for your portfolio
  • Asking master teacher and supervisors for letters of recommendation
  • By week 10 beginning to discuss handing back instruction to master teacher
  • By week 11 collecting evaluation materials from students and developing closing lessons

What do I do once I complete Directed Teaching?

The credential evaluation process includes the following:

  1. During the student's last term, usually by week 5 of student teaching, the student will submit an application for credential evaluation, which can be found at www.calstatela.edu/edcredential. It is recommended that the students turn in the applications sooner than later, because applications will be evaluated in the order they are received. So the earlier the better.
  2. After each student submit his or her application, the credential analysts in the Office for Student Services will review the student’s file and determine if all requirements have been completed. At this time, if there are any deficiencies a letter will be sent to the student. Common deficiencies are issues, such as RICA test scores, constitution test passage, and CPR certification. Expected deficiencies are completion of Directed Teaching, directed teaching seminar, and TPAs Tasks 3 and/or 4.
  3. As soon as students pass the directed teaching block TPA task(s) and passing grades post for directed teaching and Block 4 class(es), the analysts will go back to each application (again in the order in which they were received) and complete the credential application review.
  4. If all the requirements have been met at this time, then the analysts will electronically recommend student for his or her credential to the Commission for Teacher Credentialing.
  5. The Commission then emails the student, at the email address he or she listed on the application. The Commission email will invite the student to log on to the Commission's webpage, pay a fee, and answer several questions. After that time the Commission will do a final criminal and FBI background check before issuing the credential.
We wish you well during this exciting, culminating experience of your teaching credential process. Should you have any additional questions, please first contact your supervisor and then, if necessary, the Office of Student Services at 323-343-4320.Student image